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I talk about the gods, I am an atheist. But I am an artist too, and therefore a liar. Distrust everything I say. I am telling the truth.

Ursla Le Guin (1929-2018)

The Left Hand of Darkness, 1969

You You Me!

Choice Card: You You Me!
Target:
Basic Pronouns
Age:
younger children and up
Duration:
2 minutes or less
Class Size:
Small group and up
Energy Level:
medium
Type:
Mirroring Activity
Equipment:
None
fun
speed
rhythm
gestures

Introduction: This is a useful warm up exercise or space filler. We usually do it seated at a table though standing in a circle is perfectly possible.

Procedure: The teacher goes around the group in turn making a series of statements and gestures to each child individually. The aim is to repeat the sequence exactly. Here's a sample based on a group with four children:

Teacher:"Me!"taps chest

Child A:"Me!"taps chest

Teacher:"Me! Me!"taps chest twice

Child B:"Me! Me!"taps chest twice

Teacher:"You!"points at Child C with an open hand

Child C:"You!"points at the teacher with an open hand

Teacher:"You! Me!"points at Child D, taps chest

Child D:"You! Me!"points at the teacher, taps chest

Teacher:"You! You! Me!"points at Child A twice, taps chest

Child A:"You! You! Me!"points at the teacher twice, taps chest

Statements and gestures should be synchronised. Go slowly at first and vary the speed anc complexity as required. Once you and me are solid introduce she and he (with single sex classes you are limited to one pronoun unless photographs are available. For they, arrange to have a group of objects to point at, or use a photograph. For we use a circular hand motion that encompasses everyone in the group.

Notes:

It's very important to get the children gesturing strongly and speaking clearly. This can be encouraged by using a clear rhythm, varying the tempo and doing different sequences with the same child. Establish the idea that doing a sequence is a doable challenge and you've cracked it.

I use "he and "she" when gesturing rather than "him and "her". I think it is more important that these primary words are established before moving to the other forms.

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